The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) initiative has been touted as a grand plan for revitalizing economic growth and enhancing international competitiveness. While Brussels and Washington work to reach a deal, interested third countries—even major EU and U.S. trade partners—are left out, and it is unclear how accession or association could be engineered once bilateral talks are concluded.

Amid ongoing negotiations, Carnegie Europe hosted an event to launch visiting scholar Sinan Ülgen’s latest paper, “Locked In or Left Out? Transatlantic Trade Beyond Brussels and Washington,” which identifies the main obstacles to the multilateralization of TTIP.

Ülgen was joined by Damien Levie, EU deputy chief negotiator for TTIP at the European Commission, and Luisa Santos, director of international affairs at Business Europe. Shawn Donnan, world trade editor of the Financial Times, moderated.

Sinan Ülgen

Sinan Ülgen is a visiting scholar at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, where his research focuses on the implications of Turkish foreign policy for Europe and the United States, particularly with regard to Turkey’s regional stance and its role in nuclear, energy, and climate issues.

Damien Levie

Damien Levie is the EU deputy chief negotiator for TTIP and head of unit for the United States and Canada in the Directorate General for Trade at the European Commission.

Luisa Santos

Luisa Santos is director of international affairs at Business Europe.

Shawn Donnan

Shawn Donnan is the world trade editor of the Financial Times.