The destruction of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire was the greatest atrocity of World War I. Around 1 million Armenians were killed, and survivors were scattered across the world. The issue of what most of the world calls the 1915 Armenian Genocide is now a century old, yet it is still a live and divisive issue that mobilizes Armenians across the world and shapes the identity and politics of modern Turkey.

In Great Catastrophe: Armenians and Turks in the Shadow of Genocide, Carnegie scholar and reporter Thomas de Waal looks at the aftermath and politics of the Armenian Genocide. He tells the story of recent efforts by courageous Armenians, Kurds, and Turks to come to terms with disaster as Turkey enters a new post-Kemalist era.

To mark the European launch of Great Catastrophe, Carnegie Europe hosted a conversation with the book’s author. Hugh Pope, director of communications and outreach at the International Crisis Group, moderated.

Thomas de Waal

Thomas de Waal is a senior associate in the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Hugh Pope

Hugh Pope is director of communications and outreach at the International Crisis Group.