Calls for different forms of democracy are becoming more prominent and widespread. The future of global politics will depend greatly on whether and how democracy can be made more effective, participative, and accountable. Yet as Western politicians, diplomats, and experts argue in favor of non-Western democratic forms, it remains unclear what such models should look like.

In his latest Carnegie book, The Puzzle of Non-Western Democracy, Richard Youngs explains why a genuine rethink of democracy support is needed—both inside and outside the West—if democracy is to survive in a reshaped global order.

Youngs discussed these critical issues with Heather Grabbe, Jean Monnet fellow at the European University Institute, and Mikhail Minakov, associate professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. Jan Techau, director of Carnegie Europe, moderated.

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Heather Grabbe

Heather Grabbe is a Jean Monnet fellow at the European University Institute.

Mikhail Minakov

Mikhail Minakov is an associate professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy and editor in chief of the Ideology and Politics Journal.

Richard Youngs

Richard Youngs is a senior associate in Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law Program, based at Carnegie Europe.

Jan Techau

Jan Techau is the director of Carnegie Europe.