Ukraine’s October 25 local elections were relatively peaceful and democratic. Yet the country faces monumental challenges as it strives to build a transparent and accountable democratic governance system—from eroding a deep culture of corruption to keeping Ukraine’s finances in check, all while maintaining a fragile ceasefire agreement with Russian-backed rebels in the country’s east.

Carnegie Europe convened a closed, half-day workshop to assess the progress of reforms in Ukraine and discuss the EU’s role in supporting the country’s constitutional reform and democratic institution building.

Ukrainian experts Mikhail Minakov, a professor, political analyst, and consultant, and Yuriy Dzhygyr, an economist and director of the Kyiv-based think tank FISCOid, kick-started two working sessions with a briefing from Ukraine. Workshop discussions included analysis from Carnegie Europe scholars Gwendolyn Sasse and Richard Youngs. Balázs Jarábik, nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment, and Jan Techau, director of Carnegie Europe, moderated.

Yuriy Dzhygyr

Yuriy Dzhygyr is an economist and the director of the Kyiv-based think tank FISCOid.

Balázs Jarábik

Balázs Jarábik is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Mikhail Minakov

Mikhail Minakov is a professor, political analyst, and consultant.

Gwendolyn Sasse

Gwendolyn Sasse is a nonresident scholar at Carnegie Europe.

Jan Techau

Jan Techau is the director of Carnegie Europe.

Richard Youngs

Richard Youngs is senior associate at Carnegie Europe.