• What Are You Reading?

    Posted by: Judy Dempsey July 30, 2015

    Time for Strategic Europe’s annual summer reading suggestions! Carnegie Europe has asked a cross-section of diplomats, policymakers, and analysts to share their favorite books. The full selection of reading lists is available here.

     

    Steven ErlangerLondon bureau chief of the New York Times

    Foreign Policy

    Germany matters, so in combination: Germany: Memories of a Nation by Neil MacGregor, with wonderful illustrations and insight, based on the British Museum exhibition; and Reluctant Meister: How Germany’s Past is Shaping its European Future by Stephen Green.

    Fiction

    Preparation for the Next Life by Atticus Lish. A deeply moving and deeply reported novel about an illegal Chinese immigrant and an Iraqi war veteran, struggling to make a life in the far boroughs of New York City.

    Home Country (United States)

    The Harder They Come by T. C. Boyle. A great novel of Californian and American obsessions with independence, the wilderness, and violence—but with a weak title, presumably derived from the Jimmy Cliff movie.

    Guilty Pleasure

    Not so guilty, but the novels of Kent Haruf, who recently died, about the people of a Colorado town of the imagination. Especially Plainsong and Benediction.

     

    Mark LeonardCo-founder and director of the European Council on Foreign Relations

    Foreign Policy

    China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants Are Building a New Empire in Africa by Howard French. This is an amazing story about the million or more Chinese settlers who are remaking the African continent and pioneering a new model of globalization. That model is defined not by the West but by Chinese entrepreneurs, banks, and construction companies who roam the planet in search of outlets for their money and goods and the markets and raw materials needed to sustain China’s growth.

    Fiction

    The Map and the Territory by Michel Houellebecq. The map is more interesting than the territory according to the protagonist in this typically cynical tome by one of France’s most controversial authors. The book provides a sobering picture of the future available to European countries such as France in a world where economic and military power are moving elsewhere.

    Home Country (United Kingdom)

    The China-Pakistan Axis: Asia’s New Geopolitics by Andrew Small. With America withdrawing from Afghanistan and China launching its monumentally ambitious Silk Road projects, Small’s remarkable book could not be more topical. It shines a light on China’s most intense and secretive relationship, which was forged in the Cold War but which now offers the prospect of helping China move from being a regional to a global power by building a series of ports, pipelines, and other connections with the rest of the world.

     

    Radosław SikorskiFormer Polish foreign minister

    Foreign Policy

    The Great Powers and Poland, 1919–1945: From Versailles to Yalta by Jan Karski. The Polish courier who told U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt about the Holocaust was also a considerable scholar.

    Fiction

    Scoop by Evelyn Waugh. Every war reporter’s must-read on how to grab your readers’ attention.

    Home Country (Poland)

    Madame by Antoni Libera. A brilliant rendering of an anti-Communist childhood in Communist Poland.

    Guilty Pleasure

    Lucky Bastard by Charles McCarry. A spoof of a political thriller with a testosterone overdose.

     

     
     
     
  • The OSCE From Confrontation to Cooperation and Back Again

    Posted by: Stefan Lehne Wednesday, July 29, 2015 1

    In crisis situations between the West and Russia, the OSCE offers a useful safety net to preserve a minimum level of stability. No other body could replace it.

     
     
  • The Energy Security Dilemma of Turkish Stream

    Posted by: Stratos Pourzitakis Tuesday, July 28, 2015 2

    Energy dependence between the EU and Russia has increased mistrust between them, and energy has become an issue of national security for both sides.

     
     
  • What Are You Reading?

    Posted by: Judy Dempsey Monday, July 27, 2015

    Time for Strategic Europe’s annual summer reading suggestions! Carnegie Europe has asked a cross-section of diplomats, policymakers, and analysts to share their favorite books.

     
     
  • Letter From Zagreb

    Posted by: Žarko Puhovski Friday, July 24, 2015 1

    Croatia’s foreign policy paints a gloomy picture. One way for Zagreb to raise its game could be by contributing to major initiatives led by the bigger EU member states.

     
     
  • Assessing the EU’s New Democracy and Human Rights Action Plan

    Posted by: Richard Youngs Thursday, July 23, 2015

    EU member states must work hard to turn the union’s new action plan on democracy and human rights into a platform for more effective democracy support.

     
     
  • Two Crucial Tests for Turkey

    Posted by: Marc Pierini Wednesday, July 22, 2015 1

    Ankara faces two major challenges in the months ahead: forming a new government and participating effectively in the fight against Islamic State militants.

     
     
  • What Are You Reading?

    Posted by: Judy Dempsey Monday, July 20, 2015

    Time for Strategic Europe’s annual summer reading suggestions! Carnegie Europe has asked a cross-section of diplomats, policymakers, and analysts to share their favorite books.

     
     
  • Letter From The Hague

    Posted by: Louise van Schaik, Margriet Drent Friday, July 17, 2015

    Dutch foreign policy is relatively engaged and ambitious. But the Netherlands lacks a clear vision on key security issues and on ways to mitigate risks.

     
     
  • Greece and Iran Are Chances for Europe

    Posted by: Judy Dempsey Thursday, July 16, 2015

    With political will, European leaders could do much more to support Greece and Iran modernize their countries.

     
     
  • Judy Asks: Is Now the Time for More European Integration?

    Posted by: Judy Dempsey Wednesday, July 15, 2015 4

    Every week, a selection of leading experts answer a new question from Judy Dempsey on the foreign and security policy challenges shaping Europe’s role in the world.

     
     
  • What the Iran Deal Means for Europe

    Posted by: Cornelius Adebahr Wednesday, July 15, 2015

    The agreement achieved on July 14 on Iran’s nuclear program is a major achievement. But the hard work continues, especially for the EU and its member states.

     
     
  • The Euro Shows the Way for the EU

    Posted by: Jan Techau Tuesday, July 14, 2015 5

    Europeans must save the euro and, more importantly, draw the consequences of the current crisis. That means preparing for political union.

     
     
  • Turning Tsipras’s Loss Into Victory

    Posted by: Ulrich Speck Monday, July 13, 2015 2

    For Greece to transform its economy, the Greek government must start to see Brussels, Paris, and Berlin not as enemies but as partners for change.

     
     
  • Why the United States and Germany Differ Over Fixing Greece

    Posted by: Judy Dempsey Monday, July 13, 2015 1

    Despite eurozone leaders reaching a deal with Greece on July 13, Washington and Berlin have two competing economic philosophies about overcoming the Greek economic crisis.

     
     
  • Letter From Bucharest

    Posted by: Armand Goșu, Octavian Manea Friday, July 10, 2015 2

    As a country on the Eastern edge of NATO and the EU, Romania spends most of its diplomatic resources on regional security priorities.

     
     
  • Europe’s Strategic Indifference Over Greece and Ukraine

    Posted by: Judy Dempsey Thursday, July 09, 2015 1

    Greece’s economic crisis and the war in Ukraine pose similar threats to Europe’s security—threats that most European leaders prefer to ignore.

     
     
  • Judy Asks: Is Greece Killing Europe?

    Posted by: Judy Dempsey Wednesday, July 08, 2015 2

    Every week, a selection of leading experts answer a new question from Judy Dempsey on the foreign and security policy challenges shaping Europe’s role in the world.

     
     
  • The Labors of Tsipras

    Posted by: Uri Dadush Tuesday, July 07, 2015 4

    Solving Greece’s protracted debt crisis makes for a Herculean task. Does Alexis Tsipras have what it takes to pull off a deal with his country’s international creditors?

     
     
  • Greece Votes No

    Posted by: Judy Dempsey Monday, July 06, 2015 6

    In a referendum on July 5, Greeks rejected the terms of a new international bailout package for their country. Now come the hard choices for Greece and the EU.

     
     

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