Gilles Dorronsoro

Nonresident Scholar
South Asia Program
Dorronsoro’s research focuses on security and political development in Afghanistan. He was a professor of political science at the Sorbonne in Paris and the Institute of Political Studies of Rennes.
 

Education

PhD, Political Sociology, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales
MA, Contemporary History, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales
MA, International Relations, Paris 1 Sorbonne 
LLM, Paris 1 Sorbonne

Languages

English; French; Persian; Turkish

 

Gilles Dorronsoro, a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Endowment, is an expert on Afghanistan, Turkey, and South Asia. His research focuses on security and political development in Afghanistan, particularly the role of the International Security Assistance Force, the necessary steps for a viable government in Kabul, and the conditions necessary for withdrawal scenarios.

Previously, Dorronsoro was a professor of political science at the Sorbonne in Paris and the Institute of Political Studies in Rennes. He also served as the scientific coordinator at the French Institute of Anatolian Studies in Istanbul, Turkey.

He is the co-founder and editor of the South Asian Multidisciplinary Academic Journal and the European Journal of Turkish Studies. He is the author of Revolution Unending: Afghanistan, 1979 to the Present (Columbia University Press, 2005), and La révolution afghane, des communistes aux Taleban (Karthala Publishers 2000), and he is editor of La Turquie conteste. Régime sécuritaire et mobilisations sociales (Editions du CNRS, 2005).

Dorronsoro is an associate member of the French Institute of Anatolian Studies.

  • Taliban Strategy in Afghanistan is Smart Politics,
    Op-Ed U.S. News & World Report February 20, 2009
    Taliban Strategy in Afghanistan is Smart Politics, So U.S. Needs to Wise Up

    In the southern and eastern regions of Afghanistan, American troops could win every battle and still fail to hold the ground. But if the U.S. focuses in and around Kabul, it can provide security for the Afghan people, and win a peace it can pass on to them.

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  • Op-Ed National Interest Online February 9, 2009
    Going South in Afghanistan

    If it is to make a responsible exit in Afghanistan, the United States must strengthen civilian institutions and empower Afghan partners to take control of national interests.

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  • Focus and Exit: An Alternative Strategy for the Af
    Policy Outlook January 15, 2009
    Focus and Exit: An Alternative Strategy for the Afghan War

    The debate in Washington and European capitals has recently centered on how many more troops will be sent to Afghanistan in 2009 as part of a military surge. The real question, however, is how combat troops should be used - to pursue the Taliban, or secure key areas to allow institutions to develop. The main policy objective must be the development of a government that can survive U.S. withdrawal.

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Source: http://carnegieendowment.org/experts/index.cfm?fa=expert_view&expert_id=435
 
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