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  • How Russia Nourishes Radical Islam

    Terrorist threats in Russia require a long-term, consistent strategy. But Russia's system of heavy-handed and unaccountable governance precludes strategic thinking.

  • Too Little, but Perhaps Not Too Late

    The plan recently announced by European leaders to support Greece leaves many questions unanswered, and markets will likely withhold judgment on the agreement until a more credible rescue package is developed.

  • The Terrorism Hydra

    The March bombings in Moscow have shown that efforts by the Kremlin to quiet the North Caucasus have only made rebel leaders more desperate and more willing to resort to terrorism to achieve their goals.

  • A Five-Point Plan for Greece

    If European leaders are to avoid sinking deeper into a crisis with unpredictable consequences, they must take urgent and immediate action, not debate far-reaching proposals such as a European Monetary Fund.

  • Turkey's Political Revolution

    • Henri Barkey, Morton Abramowitz
    • March 22, 2010
    • Wall Street Journal

    Turkey’s ruling party has an opportunity to free Turkey from a political system heavily influenced by the military and move towards a functioning democracy that could have an enormous impact on the entire region.

  • Allies Everywhere Feeling Snubbed by President Obama

    Rather than expending energy solidifying relations with long term allies, the Obama administration has focused its foreign policy efforts on improving relations with its competitors and adversaries.

  • Israel’s Challenge to the U.S.

    The announcement of new construction in East Jerusalem that interrupted U.S. Vice President Biden’s trip to Israel to reinvigorate peace negotiations reflects the strained relations between Israel and the United States and how much remains to be done before Israeli-Palestinian negotiations can lead to real progress.

  • A Nation on the Brink

    Al-Qaeda is not the only factor threatening Yemen’s stability. Water shortages, collapsing oil supplies, war, refugees, pirates, and poverty all put the country at risk of becoming a failed state.

  • Iraqi Elections Show America's Wrong Ideas about Democracy's Power

    Iraq’s upcoming parliamentary election will not bring about any decisive changes. Elections do not cause significant power shifts; they can only reflect the power shifts that have already taken place.

  • On Foreign Policy, Obama and the GOP Find Room for Agreement

    In spite of the general perception that partisanship is dividing the U.S. government, a broad bipartisan consensus is emerging on issues of foreign policy, particularly towards Afghansitan, Iraq, and Iran.

  • Beware of Inflation Fundamentalism

    • Uri Dadush, Moisés Naím
    • March 05, 2010
    • Financial Times

    As the Euro crisis continues to play out in Greece and other weak Euro area members, the time has come for policy makers to consider moderately raising their inflation targets.

  • Turkey: Regime in Crisis

    Turkey's constitution, imposed by the military in 1982, must be redrafted if the country is to move towards a more responsive political system and avoid repeating the cycle of paralysis followed by heavy-handed military and judicial intervention.

  • NATO Must Adapt to New Challenges

    Two decades after the end of the Cold War, NATO must demonstrate that it can adapt to the security challenges of the 21st century, including nuclear weapons proliferation, terrorism and cyber-warfare.

  • Managing Vulnerability

    The goal of nuclear superiority is unattainable. Instead, the United States can enhance its security by giving nuclear-armed adversaries strong incentives for restraint in a crisis.

  • China is Misread by Bulls and Bears Alike

    While China may experience a painful financial contraction as it increases private consumption, even a dramatic slowdown of Chinese growth will not prevent China’s share of global GDP from rising.

  • U.S.-Russia Balancing Act

    While Russian leaders support the idea of a world free of nuclear weapons in theory, the Russian security community is still committed to the principle of nuclear deterrence.

  • Last Shot in Afghanistan

    The fundamental driving force of the insurgency is not economic or tribal but political, and long-term stability in Afghanistan depends on creating an open, transparent process to renegotiate the political structure of the nation in a way that includes the insurgency without betraying the Afghan people.

  • Obama Welcomes the Dalai Lama, Behind Closed Doors

    President Obama’s decision to meet with the Dalai Lama quietly is a recognition of the fact that almost every global issue requires cooperation between China and the United States, and some restraint must be shown on issues that China considers “core interests.”

  • Armenia and Turkey: The Truce in Need of a Rescue

    Armenia and Turkey have a chance to move forward from their troubled past by ratifying the historic protocols signed in October 2009. While the governments in both Yerevan and Ankara face strong opposition to the protocols, a failure to ratify the agreement could have disastrous consequences for the entire region.

  • A London Fog on Afghanistan

    The conference in London failed to suggest viable solutions to the real problems facing Afghanistan, including President Karzai’s lack of credibility, the prevalence of local corruption, and the fragmentation of power into the hands of armed local militias.

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