Gwendolyn Sasse

Nonresident Senior Fellow
Carnegie Europe

Sasse is a nonresident senior fellow at Carnegie Europe. Her research focuses on Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, EU enlargement, and comparative democratization.

Gwendolyn Sasse is a nonresident senior fellow at Carnegie Europe. Her research focuses on Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, EU enlargement, and comparative democratization.

Sasse is the director of the newly founded Centre for East European Research and International Studies (Zentrum für Osteuropa- und internationale Studien, ZOiS) in Berlin.

She is also professor of comparative politics in the Department of Politics and International Relations and the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies at the University of Oxford, where she also works on ethnic conflict, minority issues, migration, and diaspora politics.

Prior to her 2007 arrival in Oxford, Sasse was a senior lecturer in the European Institute and the Department of Government at the London School of Economics.

Her most recent books include The Crimea Question: Identity, Transition, and Conflict (Harvard University Press, 2007), which won the Alexander Nove Prize awarded by the British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies; Europeanization and Regionalization in the EU’s Enlargement to Central and Eastern Europe: the Myth of Conditionality (Palgrave, 2004; co-authored with James Hughes and Claire Gordon); and Ethnicity and Territory in the Former Soviet Union: Regions in Conflict (Frank Cass, 2001; co-edited with James Hughes). She has also published extensively in academic journals.

Sasse is a member of the Advisory Council of the European Centre for Minority Issues in Flensburg, Germany. She comments regularly on East European politics, in particular Ukraine, in U.S., British, and European media outlets.

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  • Ukraine’s Poorly Timed Education Law
    • Monday, October 02, 2017

    Ukraine’s Poorly Timed Education Law

    Endorsing bilingualism in education would be the inspired and progressive option for the Ukrainian leadership.

  • A Reminder to Continue Ukraine Reforms
    • Monday, September 04, 2017

    A Reminder to Continue Ukraine Reforms

    Without renewed domestic commitment to reforms, the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement will bring about little change in Ukraine.

  • Little Success for Little Russia
    • Monday, July 24, 2017

    Little Success for Little Russia

    A recent declaration of independence in Ukraine’s eastern occupied territories, while far from credible, provides some clues about the political situation in the region.

  • Ukrainians Travel Visa Free
    • Monday, June 26, 2017

    Ukrainians Travel Visa Free

    New visa-free arrangements for Ukrainians traveling to the EU will have several practical and, more importantly, symbolic impacts.

  • The Two Parts of Ukraine’s Donbas
    • Tuesday, May 16, 2017

    The Two Parts of Ukraine’s Donbas

    A new survey reveals that people living through the war in eastern Ukraine are not characterized by clear-cut ethnic or political identities.

  • Ukraine Takes Russia to Court
    • Tuesday, March 14, 2017

    Ukraine Takes Russia to Court

    A pending court case between Ukraine and Russia is a political act by Kyiv to raise its international profile—and is more important than many might think.

  • The Voices of the Displaced in Ukraine and Russia
    • Monday, February 13, 2017

    The Voices of the Displaced in Ukraine and Russia

    A new survey highlights the views of people displaced by the conflict in Ukraine’s eastern Donbas region.

  • What Do Ukrainians Actually Think?
    • Monday, January 16, 2017

    What Do Ukrainians Actually Think?

    There is a paucity of Ukrainian opinion poll data at a time when this should be vital information for anybody interested in helping Ukraine’s reform process.

  • Ukraine’s Visa Liberalization Saga
    • Monday, November 28, 2016

    Ukraine’s Visa Liberalization Saga

    Visa-free access to EU countries is a major attraction for Ukrainians. But delays in the process risk eroding the much-needed support of pro-EU movements in Ukraine.

  • A Step Toward Greater Transparency in Ukraine
    • Monday, October 31, 2016

    A Step Toward Greater Transparency in Ukraine

    A new database detailing the private assets of state officials, although imperfect, is a major step change in Ukrainian politics.

Education

PhD, Department of Government, London School of Economics
MSc in Russian and Post-Soviet Studies, Department of Government, London School of Economics

Languages
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Russian
  • Ukrainian
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