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  • Commentary

    Turkey: Regime in Crisis

    Turkey's constitution, imposed by the military in 1982, must be redrafted if the country is to move towards a more responsive political system and avoid repeating the cycle of paralysis followed by heavy-handed military and judicial intervention.

  • Commentary

    NATO Must Adapt to New Challenges

    Two decades after the end of the Cold War, NATO must demonstrate that it can adapt to the security challenges of the 21st century, including nuclear weapons proliferation, terrorism and cyber-warfare.

  • Commentary

    Managing Vulnerability

    The goal of nuclear superiority is unattainable. Instead, the United States can enhance its security by giving nuclear-armed adversaries strong incentives for restraint in a crisis.

  • Commentary

    China is Misread by Bulls and Bears Alike

    While China may experience a painful financial contraction as it increases private consumption, even a dramatic slowdown of Chinese growth will not prevent China’s share of global GDP from rising.

  • Commentary

    U.S.-Russia Balancing Act

    While Russian leaders support the idea of a world free of nuclear weapons in theory, the Russian security community is still committed to the principle of nuclear deterrence.

  • Commentary

    Last Shot in Afghanistan

    The fundamental driving force of the insurgency is not economic or tribal but political, and long-term stability in Afghanistan depends on creating an open, transparent process to renegotiate the political structure of the nation in a way that includes the insurgency without betraying the Afghan people.

  • Commentary

    Obama Welcomes the Dalai Lama, Behind Closed Doors

    President Obama’s decision to meet with the Dalai Lama quietly is a recognition of the fact that almost every global issue requires cooperation between China and the United States, and some restraint must be shown on issues that China considers “core interests.”

  • Commentary

    Armenia and Turkey: The Truce in Need of a Rescue

    Armenia and Turkey have a chance to move forward from their troubled past by ratifying the historic protocols signed in October 2009. While the governments in both Yerevan and Ankara face strong opposition to the protocols, a failure to ratify the agreement could have disastrous consequences for the entire region.

  • Commentary

    A London Fog on Afghanistan

    The conference in London failed to suggest viable solutions to the real problems facing Afghanistan, including President Karzai’s lack of credibility, the prevalence of local corruption, and the fragmentation of power into the hands of armed local militias.

  • Commentary

    One Year of Obama in the Middle East: Have Transatlantic Differences Narrowed?

    U.S. rhetoric has become more closely aligned with European positions on the Arab-Israeli peace process and democracy and human rights promotion in the Middle East, but there has not been a significant increase in transatlantic cooperation on these issues.

  • Commentary

    Invite the Taliban to the Afghanistan Conference

    At the international conference on Afghanistan in London, the international community should address the only issue that really matters for peace in Afghanistan: how to make the Taliban part of a lasting solution.

  • Commentary

    Talking to Moscow

    Russian President Dmitry Medvedev's proposed European security treaty has its flaws, but it is a first step toward an important conversation that must take place if a viable and undivided Euro-Atlantic security space is to be created.

  • Commentary

    Toward a Stronger European Security Architecture

    • Igor Ivanov, Wolfgang Ischinger, Sam Nunn
    • December 09, 2009
    • EuropeanVoice.com

    In response to the challenges facing the region, the Euro-Atlantic Security Initiative—an international commission to build the intellectual framework for an inclusive transatlantic security system for the 21st century—has been launched.

  • Commentary

    Europe: Losing and at a Loss?

    The European Union’s Afghanistan policies are the result of two different and contradictory constituencies: the transatlantic one, consisting of the United States and its European interests, and, on the other end of the spectrum, local party activists, who view Afghanistan as an unnecessary and dangerous war.

  • Commentary

    The Senator vs The General

    In the United States, the debate over the future of the war in Afghanistan is playing out in public, with the report by General Stanley McChrystal representing one fundamental position, and Senator John Kerry’s October 26 speech to the Council on Foreign Relations representing another.

  • Commentary

    Between A Rock and A Hard Place

    • Christina Lamb
    • November 09, 2009
    • E!Sharp

    As this year's presidential election illustrated, Afghanistan’s key problem is its lack of a credible government; while most Afghans do not want the Taliban back, they see the government of Hamid Karzai as entirely corrupt.

  • Commentary

    Time for an Afghan Surge

    The reality is that many Afghans see Kabul as part of the problem, and a runoff election is unlikely to change that. If the new Afghan government is to earn public support, and NATO is to find a way out of Afghanistan, a civilian surge will be vital.

  • Commentary

    Moving Beyond Strained Relations

    When Anders Fogh Rasmussen, NATO's secretary-general, addresses an audience at Carnegie Europe on Friday, 18th September, he will speak about the possibility of a new dialogue between two former foes – NATO and Russia. Dmitri Trenin suggests that these discussions could initially take place through the NATO-Russia Council of 2002, but in time, that they might spawn a new framework altogether.

  • Commentary

    Can Afghans Still Count on the EU?

    The EU should commit itself to a ‘civilian surge', but with Afghan rather than European civilians.

  • Commentary

    Crossing the Aisle in Paris and Washington

    Both the U.S. and French Presidents, Barack Obama and Nicolas Sarkozy, have brought key opposition figures into their administrations. As Fabrice Pothier argues, in both cases their policy influence has been minimal.

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