Judy Dempsey

Nonresident Senior Fellow
Carnegie Europe
Editor in chief
Strategic Europe

Dempsey is a nonresident senior fellow at Carnegie Europe and editor in chief of Strategic Europe.

Judy Dempsey is a nonresident senior fellow at Carnegie Europe and editor in chief of the Strategic Europe blog. She is also the author of the book The Merkel Phenomenon (Das Phänomen Merkel, Körber-Stiftung Edition, 2013).

She worked for the International Herald Tribune from 2004 to 2011 as its Germany and East European Correspondent and from 2011 to September 2013 as columnist. Dempsey was the diplomatic correspondent for the Financial Times in Brussels from 2001 onward, covering NATO and European Union enlargement. Between 1990 and 2001, she served as Jerusalem bureau chief (1996–2001), Berlin correspondent (1992–1996), and Eastern European correspondent in London (1990–1992) for the Financial Times. During the 1980s, Dempsey reported on Central and Eastern Europe for the Financial Times, the Irish Times, and the Economist.

Dempsey graduated from Trinity College, Dublin, where she studied history and political science. She has contributed to several books on Eastern Europe, including Developments in Central and East European Politics (Palgrave Macmillan and Duke University Press, 2007) and The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe: A Handbook (Frederick Muller Ltd, 1985).

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  • The Three Unresolved Issues of NATO
    • Thursday, December 05, 2019

    The Three Unresolved Issues of NATO

    NATO leaders have fundamentally different views about terrorism, Russia, and European security. Dealing with these challenges will determine the alliance’s future direction.

  • Judy Asks: Is NATO Brain-dead?
    • Thursday, November 28, 2019

    Judy Asks: Is NATO Brain-dead?

    A selection of experts answer a new question from Judy Dempsey on the foreign and security policy challenges shaping Europe’s role in the world.

  • NATO Needs a German Voice Now
    • Tuesday, November 26, 2019

    NATO Needs a German Voice Now

    Hold your breath! The American and French presidents’ provocative views on NATO are good for the alliance—provided Germany starts acting strategically.

  • Macron Challenges Europe’s Self-Denial
    • Tuesday, November 12, 2019

    Macron Challenges Europe’s Self-Denial

    By calling NATO brain-dead, President Macron has ruffled feathers across Europe in the hope of injecting a strategic culture. The takers have been few, the criticism loud, the feedback minimal.

  • Judy Asks: Is Post-1989 Europe Building Walls?
    • Thursday, November 07, 2019

    Judy Asks: Is Post-1989 Europe Building Walls?

    A selection of experts answer a new question from Judy Dempsey on the foreign and security policy challenges shaping Europe’s role in the world.

  • Europe’s Enlargement Problem
    • Tuesday, October 29, 2019

    Europe’s Enlargement Problem

    If France and Germany managed to get along, Europe would look very different—and so would the Western Balkans.

  • Judy Asks: Is Europe Endangered by Its Impotence in Syria?
    • Thursday, October 24, 2019

    Judy Asks: Is Europe Endangered by Its Impotence in Syria?

    A selection of experts answer a new question from Judy Dempsey on the foreign and security policy challenges shaping Europe’s role in the world.

  • Poles and Hungarians Move the Pendulum
    • Tuesday, October 15, 2019

    Poles and Hungarians Move the Pendulum

    The results of parliamentary elections in Poland and local elections in Hungary should push the opposition to come up with policies aimed at protecting democracy and overcoming polarization.

  • Judy Asks: Is Macron Europe’s New Foreign Policy Leader?
    • Thursday, October 10, 2019

    Judy Asks: Is Macron Europe’s New Foreign Policy Leader?

    A selection of experts answer a new question from Judy Dempsey on the foreign and security policy challenges shaping Europe’s role in the world.

  • Poland’s Diminishing Influence
    • Tuesday, October 01, 2019

    Poland’s Diminishing Influence

    Ahead of the general election in October, Poland’s support for the EU is as high as ever, but its influence in the bloc is at its weakest since it joined in 2004.

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