Gwendolyn Sasse

Nonresident Senior Fellow
Carnegie Europe

Sasse is a nonresident senior fellow at Carnegie Europe. Her research focuses on Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, EU enlargement, and comparative democratization.

Gwendolyn Sasse is a nonresident senior fellow at Carnegie Europe. Her research focuses on Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, EU enlargement, and comparative democratization.

Sasse is the director of the newly founded Centre for East European Research and International Studies (Zentrum für Osteuropa- und internationale Studien, ZOiS) in Berlin.

She is also professor of comparative politics in the Department of Politics and International Relations and the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies at the University of Oxford, where she also works on ethnic conflict, minority issues, migration, and diaspora politics.

Prior to her 2007 arrival in Oxford, Sasse was a senior lecturer in the European Institute and the Department of Government at the London School of Economics.

Her most recent books include The Crimea Question: Identity, Transition, and Conflict (Harvard University Press, 2007), which won the Alexander Nove Prize awarded by the British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies; Europeanization and Regionalization in the EU’s Enlargement to Central and Eastern Europe: the Myth of Conditionality (Palgrave, 2004; co-authored with James Hughes and Claire Gordon); and Ethnicity and Territory in the Former Soviet Union: Regions in Conflict (Frank Cass, 2001; co-edited with James Hughes). She has also published extensively in academic journals.

Sasse is a member of the Advisory Council of the European Centre for Minority Issues in Flensburg, Germany. She comments regularly on East European politics, in particular Ukraine, in U.S., British, and European media outlets.

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  • Belarus’s Optimistic Protesters and Putin’s Intentions
    • Thursday, December 03, 2020

    Belarus’s Optimistic Protesters and Putin’s Intentions

    Four months after the start of mass protests in Belarus, a new survey shows that Belarusians are optimistic they will achieve regime change. The EU must make sure it’s ready for the transition when it comes.

  • Lukashenko’s Cynical (or Desperate) Overtures to Belarus’s Opposition
    • Tuesday, October 13, 2020

    Lukashenko’s Cynical (or Desperate) Overtures to Belarus’s Opposition

    President Lukashenko’s meeting with imprisoned opposition members could be consequential for Belarus. Meanwhile, the EU and especially Germany must keep diplomatic channels open to both Minsk and Moscow.

  • The Uneven First Year of Zelenskiy’s Presidency
    • Tuesday, May 19, 2020

    The Uneven First Year of Zelenskiy’s Presidency

    In his first twelve months as Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy has notched up modest successes, but a series of missteps has eroded domestic and international trust.

  • President Zelenskiy Gambles With Government Reset
    • Tuesday, March 10, 2020

    President Zelenskiy Gambles With Government Reset

    Ukraine’s president is trying to reassert his control through a radical government reshuffle, but this risky strategy may well backfire.

  • What Hope for Ukraine and the Normandy Four Summit?
    • Tuesday, November 19, 2019

    What Hope for Ukraine and the Normandy Four Summit?

    Putin holds all the cards to maintain political leverage through a persistent low-intensity war in the Donbas.

  • Who Is Who in the Ukrainian Parliament?
    • Tuesday, September 24, 2019

    Who Is Who in the Ukrainian Parliament?

    Government and parliament are accepting President Zelenskiy’s proposals and orders too readily, thereby turning the Ukrainian political system into much more of a presidential system than it has ever been.

  • A New Start for the Ukrainian Parliament
    • Tuesday, July 23, 2019

    A New Start for the Ukrainian Parliament

    After Ukraine’s president wins a majority in the country’s parliament, the potential for real change exists, but it comes with the risk that the government could lose sight of socioeconomic and political priorities.

  • Taking Stock of Zelenskiy’s Presidency
    • Tuesday, June 18, 2019

    Taking Stock of Zelenskiy’s Presidency

    Ukraine’s recently elected President Volodymyr Zelenskiy remains largely unknown in European capitals. His true colors will come through only after Ukraine’s parliamentary election later this year.

  • What Does Zelenskiy’s Victory Say About Ukraine?
    • Tuesday, April 23, 2019

    What Does Zelenskiy’s Victory Say About Ukraine?

    The term “protest vote” does not really capture the full picture about the election result. It was a conscious vote against the incumbent and expressed hope for a new start in Ukrainian politics beyond identity cleavages.

  • Ukraine: What Comes After the Presidential Election?
    • Thursday, March 07, 2019

    Ukraine: What Comes After the Presidential Election?

    It is high time for Europe and the United States to pay much closer attention to Ukrainian politics and the whole range of possible outcomes of the elections ahead.

Education

PhD, Department of Government, London School of Economics
MSc in Russian and Post-Soviet Studies, Department of Government, London School of Economics

Languages
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Russian
  • Ukrainian
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